Book Recommendations

I recently had the amazing and surprising privilege of being a guest panelist in a conversation hosted by Oprah Winfrey with Dr. Ibram X. Kendi and four other panelists (more on this in a later post). The purpose of this conversation was to hear from each of the five panelists as we have been grappling with racism in our own lives and in the world around us. Specifically, we discussed how some of Dr. Kendi’s ideas in his latest book, How to Be an Antiracist, have shaped our understanding of racism and what we will do about racism moving forward. I was intentionally chosen for the panel because I am a White, male, “evangelical” pastor.

The purpose of this article is not to talk about this conversation I had with Oprah, Dr. Kendi, and the other panelists. Instead, I want to use this space to address what I have found helpful in Dr. Kendi’s ideas, as well as what I disagree with and must ultimately reject from his ideas. Continue Reading

Summer is finally here, and it is one that is going to look very different for many of us. With COVID-19 concerns and restrictions still a very present reality for us, how we each figure out our work situation, caring for kids when daycares are closed, and trying to balance our summer fun is going to be a real challenge.

If that weren’t enough for us to try and manage, we also have to come to terms with all of the unique challenges in our society right now. While God’s people are to be those who are united by the love of Christ (John 13:35, 17:23), there are numerous pressures which could cause us to become divided. Differing views on handling COVID-19, racial reconciliation, and politics during a heated election year are all issues our flesh, the world, and the devil would use to divide us.

In light of these unique challenges, I thought it appropriate to recommend some books for us that would help us to grow in loving each other well. Colossians 3:14 exhorts to “Put on love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony.” Maybe with a few good books in hand, we can each be proactive in training our hearts on how to better love each other during these tumultuous times. Continue Reading

One of my favorite prayers in the Psalms says this:

So even to old age and gray hairs,
O God, do not forsake me,
until I proclaim your might to another generation,
your power to all those to come. (Psalm 71:18)

The Psalmist is aware of the fatigue that old age brings, so he prays for the strength to mentor and disciple the next generation. This kind of intergenerational discipleship is assumed throughout the Bible (Deuteronomy 32:7, Psalm 78:4-6, 1 Timothy 5:1-2, Titus 2:1-6, etc.). These relationships between older and younger members of Christ’s body are a reflection of the kind of unity which God has won for us in Christ (Acts 2:42-47, 1 Corinthians 12:12ff).

I have a special burden for intergenerational relationships and discipleship in the Church, not only because it has made such an impact on my life but also because I believe it is a biblical model that is often neglected in our churches. While there’s nothing wrong with affinity groups (where we explicitly gather with other saints from common demographics), we are missing out on necessary growth and sanctification when these groups are the only Christian relationships we have.

Over the years I’ve tried to pay attention to the latest in intergenerational research, whether that is in the broader culture or in the church explicitly (sadly, the former often impacts the latter much more than the latter impacts the former). I was delighted when I learned that David Kinnaman (with his friend Mark Matlock) at the Barna Research Group put out a new work for us to learn from. Faith for Exiles: 5 Ways for a New Generation to Follow Jesus in Digital Babylon has some really insightful research and applications for ministry today. In particular, this new research sheds light on how intergenerational relationships not only need to be a priority in our churches, but it also shows us how these relationships might need to adapt for the challenges of this new age. Continue Reading

2020 Update: I update this post every year to let you know how I did on my reading plan in the previous year. Well, 2019 was pretty abysmal. I read a lot of Bible – I have to for my job! But I didn’t quite stay with my plans to read the Bible for my own edification and communion with God. But you know what? That’s ok. There’s no Bible verse that says how much and how often we are to be reading. Nevertheless, goals and plans are important to help us accomplish the things we want to do. So let’s make our plan for 2020 and move forward together. Continue Reading